River valleys are dynamic living ecosystems of utmost importance for flood attenuation that are shaped by inundation dynamics. Topographic and bathymetric surveys represent pivotal information for accurate and up-to-date floodplain studies. Both floodplain morphology as well as fluvial river cross section and thalweg profiles are required for inundation modelling and mapping. However, economic and technical limitations hinder their availability in some regions, resulting in challenges to build two dimensional (2D) flood wave routing simulations at proper accuracy and resolution. In this study, we assess the effectiveness of characterizing the fluvial morphology by means of geomorphic methods (GMs). Different GMs, used as surrogates of fluvial bathymetry, are tested and compared to a dataset of surveyed natural cross sections available for the Tiber River basin (Italy). Quantitative flood modelling performances are developed using a validated 150 m flood model, providing inundation extent and floodplain flow depths for the 200 years return period event. The ability (or inefficiency) of surrogating the lack of surveyed fluvial bathymetric data with GMs for supporting large scale hydraulic inundation modelling studies is assessed by testing the following 5 floodplain modelling configurations: (1) rectangular shaped cross section; (2) floodplain-based; (3) global river database; (4) linear regression bathymetric relationship; and (5) and a very coarse 700 grid resolution. In addition, two Global Flood Hazard Mapping (GFHM) products (hydrological, and hydrogeomorphic) were used as part of the large scale floodplain modelling evaluation framework. Results demonstrate that, once the fluvial channel flow area is preserved, all tested GM models produce consistent simulation of inundation depths and extents (Fit index ≥ 0.90). This work provides a quantitative assessment of the validity of the hypothesis stressing that the floodplain conveyance capacity is the driving principle of flood inundation dynamics under extreme flooding scenarios. Understanding the role of geomorphology during extreme magnitude floods may support the idea that under specific conditions, high resolution models and detailed topography/bathymetry are surplus to requirements. This work supports the application of geomorphic approaches over large riparian domains as a parsimonious solution for flood hazard mapping in data scarce regions for applications beyond flood mitigation and forecasting

Assessing geomorphic floodplain models for large scale coarse resolution 2D flood modelling in data scarce regions

Peña, Francisco
;
Nardi, Fernando;
2021

Abstract

River valleys are dynamic living ecosystems of utmost importance for flood attenuation that are shaped by inundation dynamics. Topographic and bathymetric surveys represent pivotal information for accurate and up-to-date floodplain studies. Both floodplain morphology as well as fluvial river cross section and thalweg profiles are required for inundation modelling and mapping. However, economic and technical limitations hinder their availability in some regions, resulting in challenges to build two dimensional (2D) flood wave routing simulations at proper accuracy and resolution. In this study, we assess the effectiveness of characterizing the fluvial morphology by means of geomorphic methods (GMs). Different GMs, used as surrogates of fluvial bathymetry, are tested and compared to a dataset of surveyed natural cross sections available for the Tiber River basin (Italy). Quantitative flood modelling performances are developed using a validated 150 m flood model, providing inundation extent and floodplain flow depths for the 200 years return period event. The ability (or inefficiency) of surrogating the lack of surveyed fluvial bathymetric data with GMs for supporting large scale hydraulic inundation modelling studies is assessed by testing the following 5 floodplain modelling configurations: (1) rectangular shaped cross section; (2) floodplain-based; (3) global river database; (4) linear regression bathymetric relationship; and (5) and a very coarse 700 grid resolution. In addition, two Global Flood Hazard Mapping (GFHM) products (hydrological, and hydrogeomorphic) were used as part of the large scale floodplain modelling evaluation framework. Results demonstrate that, once the fluvial channel flow area is preserved, all tested GM models produce consistent simulation of inundation depths and extents (Fit index ≥ 0.90). This work provides a quantitative assessment of the validity of the hypothesis stressing that the floodplain conveyance capacity is the driving principle of flood inundation dynamics under extreme flooding scenarios. Understanding the role of geomorphology during extreme magnitude floods may support the idea that under specific conditions, high resolution models and detailed topography/bathymetry are surplus to requirements. This work supports the application of geomorphic approaches over large riparian domains as a parsimonious solution for flood hazard mapping in data scarce regions for applications beyond flood mitigation and forecasting
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12071/29813
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